‘La Isla Está llena de rumores’: Revisando al Peter Pan del Pop

Sinopsis: Al artista Michael Jackson se le ha denominado a menudo con el apelativo de Peter Pan del Pop, sin embargo, este artículo presenta

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An Interview with Lisa Brisse

Abstract: This interview is part of our ongoing coverage of unique and dynamic authors who have written compelling monographs about Michael Jackson. In it,

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‘Crack Music’: Michael Jackson’s ‘Invincible’

‘Crack Music’: Michael Jackson’s Invincible

Inspired by the chapter, ‘ Invincible , The Denouement Album’ from The Dangerous Philosophies of Michael Jackson by Elizabeth Amisu (Praeger, 2016).

Little academic writing has been devoted to Michael Jackson’s final studio album, Invincible. This article explores Invincible through Kanye West’s metaphor of Crack Music from the 2005 album, Late Registration and places it in the context of black aspiration as a threat to dominant Western ideologies.

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Das Phänomen Michael Jackson

‘My ambition has been to write a book for the 16 year old fan as well as for the 60 year old professor of Philosophy. They all should read it with profit.’

Das Phänomen Michael Jackson was the first academic book ever written solely on Michael Jackson. On behalf of Jochen Ebmeier, the MJAS have published links to chapters of his recently re-published book from 1997.

This book is a biography which places Jackson in a broader context of the aesthetic of modern entertainment and art.

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Raven Woods – Langston Hughes’s “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain” (1926)

Placed with permission of the author Raven Woods

In 1926, poet and essayist Langston Hughes wrote a short but stirring piece that became a manifesto for the Harlem Renaissance, the great cultural movement that brought Black art, culture, and music to prominence in American society.  Last spring, when I assigned this essay to one of my American Lit classes, it occurred to me that much of what Hughes wrote in 1926 could also apply to many of the trials and tribulations that Michael Jackson would endure as an African-American artist more than sixty years later. Here is Langston Hughes’s essay. The sections that are highlighted are my emphasis, as these are important points that I will return to later when addressing the essay’s relevance to Michael Jackson:

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On Michael Jackson’s ‘Dancing the Dream’

Michael Jackson’s words were disseminated in liner notes, magazines and even a blog. His first published book was a 1988 autobiography, Moonwalk; the second, a children’s storybook based on Moonwalker (dir. Jerry Kramer, 1988) and the last, a 1992 publication called Dancing the Dream. ‘On Michael Jackson’s Dancing the Dream’ contextualises this collection of ‘poems and reflections’ within its author’s career and positions a work which Jackson described as ‘more autobiographical than Moonwalk’ as a pivotal moment in his career. The essay poses and answers, using emerging academic study of Jackson’s art, the following questions: ‘what exactly is Dancing the Dream’ and ‘how is it significant’?

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‘Bad (1987)’

Michael Jackson starred in and produced upwards of forty films in a career which showcases many of the most watched short films of all time. The four-minute sequence often perceived to be ‘Bad’ (dir. Martin Scorsese, 1987) is in fact the epicentre of a much longer narrative. Parodied in ‘Moonwalker’ (dir. Jerry Kramer, 1988) in the spirit of ‘Bugsy Malone’ (dir. Alan Parker, 1976), it is nevertheless targeted towards adults. Richard Price’s screenplay was inspired by a 1985 shooting and explores several complex themes. This essay de-constructs ‘Bad’ for its cinematic significance, discussing its cultural relevance and artistry through a shot-by-shot analysis which interprets the film through mise en scène, cinematography, performances and wider context.

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